IRISH ITINERARY

French - Belgian - Dutch Circuit

Central Europe Circuit

German - Dutch Circuit

Southern Circuit

Italian Circuit

Northern Circuit

The Irish Itinerary is an Irish cultural tour of Europe. This initiative of the European Federation of Associations and Centres of Irish Studies (EFACIS) started in 2013 with the first Irish Itinerary.

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Irish Itinerary - Discover the circuits

Irish Itinerary 2014: German - Dutch Circuit

The German-Dutch Circuit includes the University of Nijmegen in the Netherlands and the Universities of Saarbrücken, Mannheim and Wuppertal in Germany.

Irish Itinerary 2014: French - Belgian - Dutch Circuit

The French-Belgian-Dutch Circuit consists of the University of Leuven, the Radboud University Nijmegen and the University of Toulouse. 

Irish Itinerary 2014: Italian Circuit

The University of Florence and the University of Sassari form the Italian circuit.

Irish Itinerary 2014: Central Europe Circuit

The Central Europe Circuit consists of Charles University of Prague in the Czech Republic, the University of Vienna in Austria and the Universities of Budapest, Debrecen and Pécs in Hungary. 

Irish Itinerary 2014: Southern Circuit

The Southern Circuit consists of universities in Spain and Portugal. In Portugal the universities of Lisbon, Braga, Porto and Coimbra are participating, while in Spain the universities of A Coruña and Oviedo.

Irish Itinerary 2014: Northern Circuit

The Northern Circuit consists of the University of Agder and the University of Gothenburg. 

Irish Itinerary - Galleries


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Testimonials

Glenn Patterson’s reading was a delightful event. He talked with a great sense of humour and grabbed everyone's attention with his words. I was surprised and excited at the same time to see how he is different than the image I had built in my mind about him. I was inspired by how he carries pen and pencil in his pocket so he could write anytime, and the way he appreciates nature and his city, Belfast. Through his words, I could envision what it is like to stand on top of Cave Hill and look down on his beloved city, and through his description and short reading from his book Number 5, I felt that everyone has a story of their own, none is more or less significant than the other, and even the smallest things, the most simple practices of life can be turned into beautiful writing.

3rd-year BA student, DebrecenIrish Itinerary 2014

"The Irish Itinerary was a great success here. Rita Duffy made a fascinating presentation illuminating Irish history, politics, social conditions apart from showing examples of her own art – highly appreciated. Anne Enright's lecture was so rich and her reading magic – I can't remember her being so good ever before. And Sinéad and Darina were absolutely wonderful! ...it was brilliant, funny, poignant, subversive. They brought James joyce back to life. Now I want to look at Joyce again...We want to have them back."

Professor Brita Olinder, GothenburgIrish Itinerary 2013

"I really liked it! I already had a soft spot for James Joyce's poetry and folk music separately, and I thought the combination very appealing. I am looking forward to hearing the entire CD." (on Gerry Smyth's performance)

Annelies (student)Irish Itinerary 2013

"What Richard Did is a beautifully shot, emotionally complex drama which held my attention from beginning to end. Although the storyline is sometimes predictable, the great performance by Jack Raynor, the well written dialogues, and tense soundtrack compensate a lot. It is kind of shocking how one single incident can influence our life. Richard had almost everything a teenager could have wished for: friends, good family and financial background, a beautiful girlfriend, and a great future. But one crucial act and almost everything is destroyed. It is fascinating how different level of emotions go through the movie; happiness, love, rage, insanity, despair... I really like the conclusion of the film, which was a sort of surprise for me, that it is up to us to decide whether Richard confesses his crime or he is able to move on with his life.AISLING GHEAL

Aisling Gheal is an intriguing documentary film about traditional Irish music, Sean-nós, and Irish people who are trying to keep it alive. In my opinion, this film beautifully represents values of music, traditions, and peaceful people’s life in Ireland. The additional sceneries of the wonderful nature make the documentary visually intense. The journey of the young Shahira Apraku is quite an inspiration, but also makes me think of how the younger generation in my country lacks an interest in our traditions. I think she really captures the audience (at least me) with her beautiful voice and unceasing zest. Although I am rather fond of instrumental music this film showed me a really amazing genre."

student, Debrecen universityIrish Itinerary 2014
On 11 December 2014 the Centre for Irish Studies of the Institute of English and American Studies at Debrecen University hosted a reading by Northern Irish novelist Glenn Patterson as part of the second Irish Itinerary sponsored by EFACIS. The event was embedded in a 3rd-year BA lecture course, Introduction to Irish Studies (where his seminal novel Fat Lad is required reading), but it was widely advertised around the university and the city, thus it drew interested people beyond students enrolled for the course. Over 50 people filled the room and our guest made it absolutely worthwhile for everyone to attend.

Glenn Patterson’s reading demonstrated to the audience not only that he is a brilliant writer, but also that he is a great performer interacting with and thus involving his audience. His informative and highly enjoyable talk progressed through humorous digressions. At times it was also creatively improvised, as he engaged with the background images, the covers of his novels and Belfast landmarks, key motifs in his two most recent novels. The way he spoke about Belfast, its history and its present, was inspiring; the way he allowed the audience glimpses into the writing process as well as his writerly habits and rituals was intriguing; and the way he spoke about his personal and creative interest in Hungary was fascinating for his Hungarian audience. His reading of passages from his novels – Number 5 and The Rest Just Follows – as well as a journalistic piece about food and writing, prompted by our talks the previous day, was perfectly paced and brilliantly dramatised. It was also thrilling for me personally to listen to his reading of the opening of Fat Lad and then have the chance to read out my translation of the passage in his presence.

The event was a huge success. The local hosts are very grateful to EFACIS and the organisers of the Irish Itinerary for all their work and for securing funds to sponsor this event.

Marianna Gula, Head of CIS, Debrecen UniversityIrish Itinerary 2014

Supported by

  • EFACIS
  • Irish Film Institute
  • Culture Ireland
  • The Irish department of Foreign Affairs
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